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The Benefits of a Loan Modification

Making payments on a mortgage can be difficult and many people can find themselves in a position where they need professional assistance to be able to keep up with the financial demands. If a mortgage is repeatedly not met then the property may be foreclosed on. It is best to take action immediately to avoid any worse case scenario outcomes from occurring. Many people wait until they are too far behind but you should actually consider your options even before you miss any payments. A loan modification is one way to handle debt and through it a number of benefits may be retained:

Payments are more affordable: By working to come to an agreement you can make you monthly payments a rate that is actually possible for you to achieve. You may be paying for around three to five years so consider a realistic number.

Avoid foreclosure: Foreclosure is unfortunate but is a very real occurrence for many people. A loan modification may allow you to avoid this route all together and get back on track.

Protect your credit score: Facing debt can influence you in many ways, including hurting your credit score. A foreclosure may have a negative impact on the score in many cases but by taking the route of a loan modification instead you may be able to keep your credit score intact and eventually start improving it.

Increased payment period: When you retain a loan modification you may be able to receive a longer period of time to make the payment if you can get the lender that is involved to agree to the situation.

Remove late fees: When a plan is developed and it is apparent that you are making efforts, the lender may consider the option of freeing you from late fees that only add to the financial burden that you are left with.

Maintain value of home: Foreclosure can often harm the value of your property but a loan modification can keep it from being negatively affected.

Lower principal balance: In the loan agreement there is an amount that you are expected to repay to the creditor. This is known as the principal balance and if the creditor will agree to it you may be able to reduce this overall amount meaning that you owe less.

Each situation is different and should be treated as such. While there are many benefits to the option of a loan modification that does not mean that it is the right fit for each case. You want to find the solution that is right for you and will work for you in the long run. Work with our Long Island bankruptcy lawyer to find out what that is.

Categories: Loan Modification

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